Silver long cross penny of Edward III, initial mark Cross Potent, minted London AD 1361-3 from context 8029, Evans Halshaw site, Hyde Street, Winchester.

Silver long cross penny of Edward III, initial mark Cross Potent, minted London AD 1361-3 from context 8029, Evans Halshaw site, Hyde Street, Winchester.

Silver long cross penny

Medieval, between 1361 and 1363

Found in the early 2000s by Wessex Archaeology at the Evans Halshaw site, Hyde Street, Winchester, Hampshire

The 'long cross' on the reverse of the penny is a feature introduced in the reign of Henry III (1216-1272). The 'short cross', which it replaced, failed to reach the rims of pennies, making it too easy for people to illegally clip the silver from their edges. This particular penny was minted in London in the time of Edward III (1327-1377). It belongs to the period when Edward was negotiating the Treaty of Brétigny, which granted him land in France, and the inscription reads EDWARD ANGL R DNS HYB, 'Edward king of England and lord of Ireland'.

Silver long cross penny of Edward III, initial mark Cross Potent, minted London AD 1361-3 from context 8029, Evans Halshaw site, Hyde Street, Winchester.